Clinical Ethics: Advocacy: Whose Job Is It? ASHA’s Principle of Ethics III (1994) addresses the following: Individuals shall honor their responsibility to the public by promoting public understanding of the professions, by supporting the development of services designed to fulfill the unmet needs of the public, and by providing accurate information in all communications involving any ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 1999
Clinical Ethics: Advocacy: Whose Job Is It?
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Angela Mandas
    Long Beach, CA
  • Jo Puntil-Sheltman
    Long Beach, CA
Article Information
Clinical Ethics
Article   |   October 01, 1999
Clinical Ethics: Advocacy: Whose Job Is It?
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 1999, Vol. 9, 5-6. doi:10.1044/aas9.3.5
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 1999, Vol. 9, 5-6. doi:10.1044/aas9.3.5
ASHA’s Principle of Ethics III (1994) addresses the following:
Individuals shall honor their responsibility to the public by promoting public understanding of the professions, by supporting the development of services designed to fulfill the unmet needs of the public, and by providing accurate information in all communications involving any aspect of the professions.
Clinicians should interpret this principle as Advocacy. As we approach the millennium, we must rally together to promote our profession and to secure our patients’ future in an ever changing health care environment. No one will do it for us. It is up to us to take a stand.
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