Outcomes Measurement and Management: Outcomes Measurement in a University Setting Educators in Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) need to be knowledgeable about outcomes measurement for two reasons. First, as the persons who prepare speech-language pathologists and audiologists, they are primarily responsible for teaching their students how to measure outcomes in the clinical environment. And, second, as educators who work ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 1997
Outcomes Measurement and Management: Outcomes Measurement in a University Setting
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Judith A. Rassi
    Division of Hearing and Speech Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
    Director of Clinical Education
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   October 01, 1997
Outcomes Measurement and Management: Outcomes Measurement in a University Setting
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 1997, Vol. 7, 5-7. doi:10.1044/aas7.3.5
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 1997, Vol. 7, 5-7. doi:10.1044/aas7.3.5
Educators in Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) need to be knowledgeable about outcomes measurement for two reasons. First, as the persons who prepare speech-language pathologists and audiologists, they are primarily responsible for teaching their students how to measure outcomes in the clinical environment. And, second, as educators who work in institutions, they are often called upon to measure outcomes of their own individual and organizational efforts. This article addresses the latter area. Rationale, purposes, and goals are outlined.
Outcomes measurement, in one form or another, has been an integral part of most university educational programs throughout their existence. In traditional higher education, like secondary and elementary education, student learning is typically assessed via standardized and nonstandardized examinations. Evaluating the effectiveness of classroom instruction and curriculum design is not uncommon. Accrediting bodies set standards that require universities not only to maintain adequate resources and personnel but also to engage regularly in program self-study and obtain outcome measures as part of their program planning and evaluation (ASHA, 1994; ASHA, 1995).
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