Supervisor and Supervisee Perceptions of an Adult Learning Model of Graduate Student Supervision Adult learning models rarely are applied to clinical supervision in communication sciences and disorders. Little evidence exists to attest to the utility of implementing adult learning models during clinical supervision of graduate students. To explore supervisor and supervisee perceptions of clinical supervision that used an adult experiential learning model as ... University
University  |   April 01, 2013
Supervisor and Supervisee Perceptions of an Adult Learning Model of Graduate Student Supervision
Author Notes
  • Disclosure: As noted in the Acknowledgments, authors Monica Gordon-Pershey and Patrick R. Walden received grant funds for research support in the investigation outlined in this article from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Special Interest Group 11, Administration and Supervision.
    Disclosure: As noted in the Acknowledgments, authors Monica Gordon-Pershey and Patrick R. Walden received grant funds for research support in the investigation outlined in this article from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Special Interest Group 11, Administration and Supervision.×
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions
University   |   April 01, 2013
Supervisor and Supervisee Perceptions of an Adult Learning Model of Graduate Student Supervision
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, April 2013, Vol. 23, 12-21. doi:10.1044/aas23.1.12
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, April 2013, Vol. 23, 12-21. doi:10.1044/aas23.1.12

Adult learning models rarely are applied to clinical supervision in communication sciences and disorders. Little evidence exists to attest to the utility of implementing adult learning models during clinical supervision of graduate students. To explore supervisor and supervisee perceptions of clinical supervision that used an adult experiential learning model as its theoretical approach, we conducted a semester-long study of university clinical supervisors and first-year speech-language pathology graduate students. Five university supervisor–supervisee dyads implemented a model of adult experiential learning during weekly supervisory feedback sessions for one semester. Use of the adult experiential learning model yielded perceived benefits for clients, students, and supervisors. Supervisors noted that use of the model was somewhat of a departure from their usual ways of supervising. Overall, participants perceived the model as beneficial to supervisees’ learning of clinical skills and decision-making. The model facilitated students’ generalization of clinical skills across their clinical experiences. The impracticalities of this method of implementing the model could be reduced in future studies by providing a longer period of pre-implementation supervisor training, during which supervisors would adapt their current supervision practices to the model. Ton conclude, authors offer a proposed decision tree to guide implementation of the model.

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