Broadening the “Ports of Entry” for Speech-Language Pathologists: A Reflective Model of Supervision The purpose of this article is to explore core concepts that are integral to developing a relationship-based and reflective model of supervision in speech-language pathology. Many of the concepts to be discussed emerged from the study of infancy and mental health. These fundamental constructs will be used to illustrate how ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2014
Broadening the “Ports of Entry” for Speech-Language Pathologists: A Reflective Model of Supervision
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elaine Geller
    Department of Speech Communication Arts and Sciences, Brooklyn College of the CUNY, Brooklyn, NY
  • Financial Disclosure: Elaine Geller is a professor at Brooklyn College of the CUNY.
    Financial Disclosure: Elaine Geller is a professor at Brooklyn College of the CUNY.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Elaine Geller has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Elaine Geller has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article.×
  • The article is based on a Short Course (Geller, 2013) presented at the Annual Convention of the ASHA in Chicago, IL, 2013.
    The article is based on a Short Course (Geller, 2013) presented at the Annual Convention of the ASHA in Chicago, IL, 2013.×
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2014
Broadening the “Ports of Entry” for Speech-Language Pathologists: A Reflective Model of Supervision
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 2014, Vol. 24, 51-61. doi:10.1044/aas24.2.51
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 2014, Vol. 24, 51-61. doi:10.1044/aas24.2.51

The purpose of this article is to explore core concepts that are integral to developing a relationship-based and reflective model of supervision in speech-language pathology. Many of the concepts to be discussed emerged from the study of infancy and mental health. These fundamental constructs will be used to illustrate how clinical educators can expand their traditional approaches to supervision with the goal of embedding these constructs within discipline-specific training. Each construct will be briefly defined followed by how the construct can be applied to supervision. Two supervision scenarios will be examined as to how relationship-based and reflective principles were integrated into supervision.

Acknowledgments
The author wishes to express her gratitude and deep appreciation to the supervisors who willingly shared their stories. They were open, courageous and inspiring as they examined this material in an ongoing reflective supervision group.
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.