Promoting Cultural Competence in Academics and Clinical Education In the 21st century, academic climate educators must be knowledgeable of and sensitive to differing cultural values and customs of the students we educate and patient populations we serve. Demographic projections for the United States over the next 20–40 years suggest a decrease in the current white majority to that ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2014
Promoting Cultural Competence in Academics and Clinical Education
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Patricia McCarthy
    Department of Communication Disorders and Sciences, Rush University, Chicago, IL
  • Dianne Meyer
    Department of Communication Disorders and Sciences, Rush University, Chicago, IL
  • Joanne Schupbach
    Department of Communication Disorders and Sciences, Rush University, Chicago, IL
  • Financial Disclosure: Patricia McCarthy is Professor and Audiology Program Director at Rush University. She is also invited faculty member at the Ida Institute in Denmark and an ASHA Fellow. Dianne Meyer is Chairperson of the Department of Communication Disorders and Sciences at Rush University and an ASHA Fellow. Joanne Schupbach is an Assistant Professor and the Manager of Audiology Clinical Education at Rush University.
    Financial Disclosure: Patricia McCarthy is Professor and Audiology Program Director at Rush University. She is also invited faculty member at the Ida Institute in Denmark and an ASHA Fellow. Dianne Meyer is Chairperson of the Department of Communication Disorders and Sciences at Rush University and an ASHA Fellow. Joanne Schupbach is an Assistant Professor and the Manager of Audiology Clinical Education at Rush University.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Patricia McCarthy has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article. Dianne Meyer has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article. Joanne Schupbach has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Patricia McCarthy has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article. Dianne Meyer has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article. Joanne Schupbach has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2014
Promoting Cultural Competence in Academics and Clinical Education
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 2014, Vol. 24, 71-75. doi:10.1044/aas24.2.71
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 2014, Vol. 24, 71-75. doi:10.1044/aas24.2.71

In the 21st century, academic climate educators must be knowledgeable of and sensitive to differing cultural values and customs of the students we educate and patient populations we serve. Demographic projections for the United States over the next 20–40 years suggest a decrease in the current white majority to that of a minority, with corresponding increases among Hispanic and Asian American Groups (Pew Research Hispanic Center, 2008). Most facets of our society are, and will continue to be, impacted by such large transformations, and this includes all components of academic programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD). This burgeoning growth of cultural diversity in the United States is mirrored in both the student body and the patient populations we serve. As such, developing “cultural competence” has become an imperative for CSD programs as there is a growing need to work effectively within the cultural context of patients, their families, and their communities. In this paper, we focus on Rush University’s (RU) ongoing experience with creating cultural competence among students, faculty, and preceptors in academics and clinical education.

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