Outcomes Measurement and Management: Clinical Tools for Evaluating Functional Outcomes in Clinical Audiology It is now widely accepted that routine pure-tone and speech audiometry alone are poor predictors of the impact a given hearing loss has on communication ability and psychosocial function in everyday life. A number of self-report measures have been developed with the aim of evaluating hearing disability (e.g., communication ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 1999
Outcomes Measurement and Management: Clinical Tools for Evaluating Functional Outcomes in Clinical Audiology
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Craig W. Newman
    Section of Communicative Disorders, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Outcomes Measurement and Management
Article   |   July 01, 1999
Outcomes Measurement and Management: Clinical Tools for Evaluating Functional Outcomes in Clinical Audiology
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, July 1999, Vol. 9, 3-6. doi:10.1044/aas9.2.3
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, July 1999, Vol. 9, 3-6. doi:10.1044/aas9.2.3
It is now widely accepted that routine pure-tone and speech audiometry alone are poor predictors of the impact a given hearing loss has on communication ability and psychosocial function in everyday life. A number of self-report measures have been developed with the aim of evaluating hearing disability (e.g., communication function in background noise, from a distance, and/or in a reverberant environment) and handicap (e.g., non-auditory problems that may interfere with physical independence, social integration, and/or economic sufficiency). Many clinicians have found the inclusion of such self-report disability and handicap measures as worthwhile additions to the audiologic test battery. The reasons are numerous and include: (a) helping substantiate auditory complaints not apparent by results of conventional audiometry, (b) determining personal adjustment to hearing loss, (c) assessing hearing aid candidacy, (d) serving as a guide in designing personalized rehabilitation goals and strategies, (e) marketing hearing health care delivery services, (f) usage as a key component in the calculation of staff compensation (i.e., identifying outstanding clinicians with consistently positive clinical outcomes), and (g) quantifying the effectiveness of rehabilitation efforts.
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